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The Montana Conservationist, February 2020

This week in The Montana Conservationist:

  • The BLM is proposing new regulations for grazing, and now is your time to submit your comments on the changes!
  • The EPA has published a new “Navigable Waters Protection Rule” (the rule formerly known as WOTUS), with a significant reduction in jurisdictional waterways. Read what the new rule will mean for farmers and ranchers.
  • A new computational model shows how crop rotation helps combat plant pests, and calculates the best rotational scenario. (Hint: it’s not just a two crop, every-other-year model)
  • Scientists in Colorado are studying the respiration rates of the tiny prairie smoke wildflower (OMG plant breath! so cute!) to help figure out how a changing climate will affect water in the west.
  • Montana has joined a new multi-state invasive species council, formed recently by the Western Governors Association to help coordinate efforts to fight invasive species, especially the dreaded quagga mussel (is that a monster in the Princess Bride? I can’t recall)
  • Montana DEQ has selected the lower Gallatin as its next focus Nonpoint Source Management Focus Watershed (move over, Bitterroot)
  • Economic studies are showing that investments in combating climate change could help rural economies, which sounds like a win-win to me. One example: the large number of wind farms currently lining up to call Rapelje home.
  • MTPR has a story about concerns that recent environmental regulation rollbacks could hurt the burgeoning water protection business.

All of that, plus grants! and jobs! and events! Read the Montana Conservationist: TMC 2020-02-04

Kate Arpin

Kate is the Communications and Technology Manager for Soil & Water Conservation Districts of Montana. She manages the website, puts out The Montana Conservationist every other week, and assists conservation districts with technology, websites, and communications.

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